Not So Friendly Skies – SLV Residents Move to Stop Proposed Jet Flightpath

By Mary Andersen

A new flight path has Happy Valley and Los Gatos/Saratoga residents angry and eager to move it to the San Lorenzo Valley. Some claim that, since their homes are worth more than ours, the path should be shifted out of their neighborhoods and onto ours.

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Photo by Sean McLean

 

We already have a flight path. It’s called BIGSUR, or BSR, and it routes over downtown Santa Cruz, Pasatiempo, west Scotts Valley, north through SLV to the Summit Skyline area, to San Francisco International Airport (SFO). This path is still in use today and supports older aircraft not equipped with satellite navigation.

In March 2015 the FAA, as part of their Next Generation Air Transportation program (NextGen), implemented a new path, called SERFR, which travels from the coast at Capitola, over Happy Valley and Los Gatos summit towards SFO. This path was designed to accommodate a wide range of aircraft with satellite navigation capabilities. SERFR is low, loud, and concentrated. The FAA says they can fix that.

Neighborhoods under SERFR lodged thousands of complaints. With the assistance of Congressman Sam Farr they organized Save Our Skies Santa Cruz and were later joined by Quiet Skies NorCal. They created a proposal for a new flight path, called DAVYJ, over the City of Santa Cruz, SLV, and communities in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties. Keep in mind, this new path would be in addition to the BSR flight path we already have. The proposal was endorsed by Farr and 1st District Supervisor John Leopold.

Community groups from the coast to the airport rejected the Quiet Skies NorCal proposal noting that it eliminated noise for those under SERFR by increasing noise and airplane traffic for communities under the proposed new DAVYJ flight path. In addition, DAVYJ was offered up as the only solution, when in fact other proposals submitted by groups closer to the airport were ignored.

In March, Supervisor Leopold wrote that the proposal constituted a “regional solution” that had been “worked on by all community groups throughout the area.” Congressman Farr stated in his newsletter that he hand-delivered the Quiet Skies NorCal proposal to Michael Huerta, Administrator of the FAA, assuring him that it was “the ideal solution.” Both assertions were false – residents under the proposed DAVYJ flight path in Santa Cruz and SLV were neither informed nor invited to provide input.

In April, Congressional Representatives Anna Eshoo, Jackie Speier, and Sam Farr appointed 12 elected officials (+12 alternates) to a Select Committee on SFO Arrivals. Their charter has been to analyze items labeled “feasible” by the FAA, accept community input, and report to Congress with a set of recommendations.

When the FAA released their study in May, Santa Clara and San Mateo County community groups were frustrated to see that their recommendations were not included. Only suggestions from Quiet Skies NorCal were addressed including the flight path shift to SLV. And the FAA made clear that, while feasible, DAVYJ would be similar to SERFR in its noise impact to SLV. It would be lower, louder, and more concentrated than any flight path we had experienced in the past.

The Select Committee asked why DAVYJ was the only option presented. The FAA said that DAVYJ was the only option offered by Congress. To their credit, the Select Committee is open to other options.

As you might expect, the issue is a political football. In Santa Cruz County SERFR lies primarily in Congressman Farr’s and Supervisor Leopold’s districts. Both SERFR and the proposed DAVYJ are in Supervisor Bruce McPherson’s and Congresswoman Eshoo’s districts. Low flying DAVYJ vectored planes would severely impact Supervisor Ryan Coonerty’s district and the path itself would impact the City of Santa Cruz.

The irony is that the FAA is a $16.4 billion organization with thousands of credentialed aviation experts. Yet, laypeople hoping to remove a flight path from over their homes were allowed to design a new flight path over other communities. That new flight path, DAVYJ, over SLV and Santa Cruz, is currently being vetted by elected officials with limited aviation knowledge, who will then submit recommendations to congressional representatives with even less aviation knowledge, who were misled into believing it was a regional solution when it is not.

Website: www.sanlorenzovalley.info/

Petition: www.change.org/p/faa-stop-the-quiet-skies-norcal-proposal-which-seeks-to-move-an-sfo-flight-path-to-sc-slv-sv

Facebook: www.facebook.com/flightpathfacts/

Join the meetings: flightpathfacts@gmail.com

Additional contributors: George Wylie, Nancy Gerdt, Glenn Lyons, Roz Alley, Alastair Fyfe, Jacqui Rice, Beth Carlisle, Terry Hollenbeck, Thomas Andersen, Colleen Miller, Clifford Stow, Jennifer Parks

This article was originally published in the Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin  September 2016: http://mountainbulletin.com/article/proposed-flightpath-threatens-the-slv/

The Magic of a Chance – Drifting Compass

By Julie Horner

One of summer’s guilty pleasures: Winding home on Bear Creek Road on an exceptionally warm, sunny late afternoon under the redwoods, with windows rolled down and music cranking. Spirits soaring, I was testing the rubber on the familiar home stretch with the soft July wind in my hair, grinning ear-to-ear and somehow managing to resist fist-pumping out the skylight. Eyes on the road, hands upon the wheel.

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The disc in the player was Drifting Compass’s 2015 self-produced EP, Grains of Sand, all-original rock music that reminded me of younger days with uniquely familiar hooks and infectious lyrics about dreams, realities, new beginnings, and the urgent vibrance of living life.

I had just gotten the CD after bumping into singer-songwriter, Dave “Nomad” Miller, at a recent meeting of community members to ramp up fundraising efforts for Yvonne and Kelly McGuire, who lost all in the Felton Trout Farm fire in early June. “We were supposed to do a show at Felton Trout Farm in July and were purposely building anticipation to get the most folks out to the show,” Dave told me. “I consider Kelly and Yvonne to be like family. Ever since they’ve owned the place they’ve been open to suggestions to get good music, inviting people in for pow wows. After the fire it was like, “If there’s anything you could do to help.”

Dave spent years on the road performing as a solo artist and adopted the name, “Nomad,” as a result. “I purposely packed up my van with everything I felt I needed and started heading west. I lived on the road for seven years, playing acoustically at coffee shops…it’s kind of how the name ‘Drifting Compass’ came about.” The open road became muse for his songwriting. “Some of the wisest people I met while on the road.” In Spokane he met a street prophet who told him, “There’s no such thing as wasted time, there’s only wasted lessons.”

He wound up in Santa Cruz by mistake. “I thought a friend lived there but he actually lived in Fremont.” Sometimes a wrong turn can lead to the best discoveries and now he’s set down roots in Santa Cruz. “I’ve been here more than 20 years and love it.”

“I put the band together in late 2006 but didn’t start gigging regularly until mid-2007.” They’ve had some member changes here and there: “It’s hard to find people sometimes. My lead guitar player has been with me for five years. It’s the best I’ve felt about the lineup – I’m really happy right now.”

Drifting Compass is Nomad (guitar, lead vocals); Colin Bockman (lead guitar, vocals); Dana Young (bass guitar, vocals); and Jeff Smits (drums, vocals). Sometimes people sit in on keyboards or harmonica; they even had an opera singer once. While the band is based on originals, Dave says when they throw covers in “people light up.” But they do cover material in their own way, putting a “Drifting Compass twist” to it. “We have a grungy Americana style, we turn whatever we play into that genre. My vocals, Colin’s distorted guitar leads, we’ll turn them around for playing out.”

A name ubiquitous in San Lorenzo Valley, Drifting Compass plays regularly throughout the Monterey and San Francisco Bay Areas. “Our biggest goal right now is to see as many people as possible at our live shows.” They just did a show in Monterey on July 9. “The place was so packed at times that it was hard to navigate through the bodies without spilling drinks. We had a great time!”

They’ll be at the Santa Cruz Mountain Art, Music and Wine Festival in Boulder Creek over Labor Day weekend and at Henflings in Ben Lomond in October. Other performances coming up this fall include venues in Hollister, Berkeley, San Francisco, and at the Mystic Theater Mendocino with Reckless Kelly. And of course there’s the local Drool Pigs Festival, the annual craft beer and local music extravaganza Erik Rozite (Acoustic Shadows) hosts in Boulder Creek, this year on October 17. “We were one of the founding bands – Erik always invites us back. Erik and I were actually doing acoustic shows together before we started up our respective bands.”

Drifting Compass’s next CD, tentatively called “Grit,” is in the works and is being recorded at Gadget Box in Westside Santa Cruz. “Andy and Patrick are amazing…they’re well worth it.”

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Captivating with acoustic-driven rhythms and original songs, Drifting Compass creates music in the Alternative-Rock vein with a little dirt, a little sugar, and a whole lot of fist-pumping vibe. “The biggest thrill of it all is the energy that the crowd feeds to you, you feed to them – everybody has a great time.”

On the Web: www.driftingcompass.com

On Facebook: www.facebook.com/driftingcompass

Julie Horner is an Irish style folk musician and writer living in the Santa Cruz Mountains. www.santacruzmountainslocal.com | leap2three@gmail.com

This article was originally published in the Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin: http://mountainbulletin.com/article/drifting-compass-the-magic-of-a-chance/

Healing for the Human Tribe – Boulder Creek Welcomes SLV Alano Club

By Julie Horner

The south end of Boulder Creek’s main drag is humming with life again as SLV Alano Club fills the empty space left by Video 9. A frequent downtown stroller, I admit I hadn’t walked that distance along Highway 9 since the video store closed, usually making it only as far as the new Village Farm to tend the Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin garden plot. It was a pleasant surprise to enter the familiar premises to find comfortable sofas, a big screen TV with folks gathered round to watch a DVD, and tables of community members busily collaborating. The atmosphere was convivial, casual, and welcoming to a stranger blowing in off the street.

Co-owner Rickey E rose from the conversation to greet me, offering a warm, well calloused working man’s hand. He gave me the tour, peering into the meeting room in the back where rows of sofas and chairs were arranged facing forward awaiting meeting night when people from all walks of life come to lay down their burdens and hear much needed words of encouragement. He pointed to snacks, water, and sodas in a refrigerated case and a plate of donuts on the counter, all of which, he explained, are gratis to anyone who has come to the center for support and needs something to tide them over. Donations are accepted but they cannot charge for the refreshments.

He invited me to Google “Alano Club” and continued with his own description: “Alano is a worldwide chain of centers for helping folks become clean and sober – we facilitate a space for Alcoholics Anonymous (A.A.) 12-step recovery meetings.” These centers are privately owned businesses that supply a safe, clean place to recover along with the fellowship of supporters who are also in recovery. “We will not turn away anyone who is hungry or needy,” he said.

“In this room we have people who have been sober anywhere from 6 months to 30 years; it’s a diverse group. We have plenty of sofas, plenty of room, plenty of people to help and who are willing to share their experience with people who need help.”

Along with fellow business owners, Joe E and Indrich M, and staff members, Carl S and Charles W, who welcome visitors on the day to day (the tradition in recovery communities is not to use last names), SLV Alano Club hosts 17 A.A. meetings a month and an “Anything Goes” group of Narcotics Anonymous (N.A.) that meets twice a month.

Rickey says they’ve been up and running for about two months now. “We’re modeling our startup after all the others, and there are literally thousands of them worldwide, even in Eastern Europe,” he said. With a donated pool table that the teens mostly use when their folks are in meetings, and free Wi-Fi for anyone who needs to be connected, they’re planning to make the new location permanent as soon as they get confirmation from the building owner. For now, it’s month-to-month, and they have a backup location chosen in Felton just in case. But he has a good feeling about Boulder Creek and is sure, “It’s up and onward from here!”

Rickey has decades of experience helping others. “Many of us came from the Ben Lomond Fellowship.” That’s the always bustling location on Highway 9 in a house that he says belonged to a once-upon-a-time Superman and was left to the group in the actor’s will…they have a 99-year lease, he says.

“Alano Club operates as a full committee of community members that helps guide the ship. By purpose and regulation, no one person has the power…it’s set up to be a group effort.” A.A. at large does not advertise: They base their efforts on attraction rather than promotion. “Alano Club is a separate entity – it’s like separation of church and state – neither tells the other what to do.” Rick facilitates community connection and runs the meetings but says, “I am your servant, not your boss.”

The main takeaway for people who are new: “We’re here to be of service to help people become and stay sober.”

The greater community of neighbors helping neighbors includes SLV Museum, which has opened up their grounds to the group for horseshoe tournaments, block parties, and parking, and Boulder Creek United Methodist Church, which hosts A.A. and Al-Anon meetings. Rickey says his mother-in-law plans to start another Al-Anon meeting at SLV Alano Club as well.

“There are a lot of folks in need in the area. And we’re not all poor.” It’s a point about perception that resonates. Alcoholism and substance abuse can affect anyone, regardless of economic or social status. Rickey says, “The ‘financially recovered’ help carry those who are new or having a harder time. Therein lies our open-door policy. Anyone trying to stay clean and sober is welcome.”

While much of the efforts focus on serving portions of the community who cannot pay for help, they do take donations, and in fact, memberships are necessary to help keep the doors open. The cost of a membership at SLV Alano Club is $200 a year and companies and individuals who step up to sponsor Alano programs are listed as generous donors on Alano Club’s vast online network.

One of the most rewarding moments in service of those in need is “the new guy who walks in the door and he’s still shaky. We pretty much circle around him.

SLV Alano Club is kid- and good dog-friendly. “Our doors are always open – from 8:00 am to 9:00 pm – come on in and say hello. Any time.”

12550 Central Ave, Boulder Creek, CA 95006 | 831-217-5034

SLV Alano Club: www.facebook.com/SLV-Alano-Club-1784832801802974

Alano Clubs: http://alanoclubs.org/

GoFundMe: www.gofundme.com/2t9hh9ec

Copyright 2016 Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin. This article was originally published in the Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin: www.santacruzmountainbulletin.net

Positively Sundrenched & Soul-Filled – The Third Annual Santa Cruz Mountain Sol Festival

An interview by Julie Horner with Stephen Wyman, co-producer of the annual Santa Cruz Mountain Sol Festival.

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JH: This has become a major outdoor festival for the area so how did you get into it?

SW: Ironically. I’ve been volunteering with Redwood Mountain Faire since its rebirth at Roaring Camp. And as one the owners of the Boulder Creek Brewery, I was interested in producing events that would help drive our business forward. And in broader terms, events that would help bring economic vitality to our community. Fill restaurants, fill motels, hire local folks, local food vendors, and provide artists with an outlet.

JH: How are you able to attract such amazing performers to the event?

SW: Michael Horne is the genius of the business partnership. He’s been a Santa Cruz promoter for over 30 years and has presented more than 3,000 shows! It is very complicated to put great lineups together, so it’s his years of relationships with musicians and agents.

JH: You’ve got Edward Sharpe, George Clinton, and Sheila E at the top of a really impressive lineup of artists.

SW: We have certain artists whom we truly admire and hope to bring to the Santa Cruz Mountains, artists that we and our community have a connection to. We try to bring a blend of classic and new artists. We consider the venue and our neighbors. Although we can’t make everyone happy, we try to be considerate.

JH:  Name some of the acts that you’re especially excited to have on board this year.

SW: That’s a loaded question, because every artist we book is a favorite for one reason or another. This year we were inspired by the loss of Prince. We talked lots about the influence he had on music and culture. And we also dug deeper in our discussions like who influenced Prince and how he was so into the 1970’s Bay Area music scene. He came to SF in 1978 to record in the studio used by Santana and other Bay Area greats. Sheila E.‘s dad, Pete Escovedo, was playing in Santana’s band at the time. So this led us to invite Sheila E. and Katdelic and to ask George Clinton & Parliament Funkadelic. George Clinton is an icon and we feel the chance to share is now – George Clinton turned 75 this year!

JH: I would imagine the variety of music will appeal to all age groups. What have you got for the younger scene?

SW: On Saturday we have Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros. They headlined Coachella this year and had a sold out show this spring at the Greek theater in Berkeley. They should bring some concert goers to Felton who haven’t visited our valley before. And I think folks my age will have a treat in discovering this kind of artist.

JH: It must be an enormous task transforming a quiet mountain meadow into an outdoor good-love-and-vibrations festival space.

SW: Aside from the monetary considerations, there are so many details to contend with. Routing, logistics, travel, backline, staging, etc. Multiply this by every artist timeslot over the course of the weekend and you start to get an idea of the juggling job that is required.

JH: How does the venue at Roaring Camp suit the event, do people just love it?

SW: We love Roaring Camp. It’s an amazing space. There is the beautiful meadow, parking, and some infrastructure. Attendees having been glowing about the festival. We have 4.9 stars out of 5. We’re working on the missing fraction! Roaring Camp and its director have been supportive: Roaring Camp is keenly interested in supporting economic vitality in the valley.

JH: More people than ever seem to be falling in love with summer festivals and I hear Mountain Sol is attracting more peeps! You guys must be feeling pretty stoked!

SW: We are steadily growing. It’s our third year. That’s like Wednesday in the festival business. We’re trying hard to get to the weekend.

JH: What makes the Sol Fest so wonderful?

SW: Our event is a boutique festival. It’s small compared to most music festivals. It’s intimate. Everyone is close to the stage. Festival goers feel a direct connection to the artists and to their community. You’re not looking at a giant live video screen. You are there and in it.

JH: So this festival is all ages and locally do-able.

SW: Named by many of our fans as “the hometown throw down,” it’s more like a community party. We see our neighbors and friends there. People are generally kind and thoughtful – watching out for each other. We attract a wide range of guests: Local families, couples, and college-age young adults.

JH: What can festival goers expect from this year’s festival as far as good vibes, food, and things to purchase?

SW: In addition to our amazing artist lineup, there will be local food vendors, artists, a kid’s area, and of course train rides!

JH: What would you advise people to bring with them?

SW: Bring a hat, refillable water bottles (free filtered water is available), ear plugs for the kids if you’re bringing young children, a designated driver…NO drinking and driving! No, no, no! Low back folding chairs and blankets are allowed but please no dogs and no bad attitudes. DO bring smiles, an open heart, and dancing shoes!

JH: I was at last year’s festival and had such a relaxing, boogie-filled uplifting time! What makes you the happiest about putting on the Sol Fest?

SW: When folks in the community stop me to tell me what wonderful time they had!

Santa Cruz Mountain Sol Festival September 17-18, 2016 Roaring Camp Meadows. Felton, California 95018 On Facebook: www.facebook.com/scmsfest

Tickets: www.santacruzmountainsol.com/tickets.shtml

Email: info@santacruzmountainsol.com

This article was originally published in the Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin: http://mountainbulletin.com/article/positively-sundrenched-soul-filled/

The Leftovers – Hashtag: Feelgoodmusic

By Julie Horner

 

Another glorious hot summer day under a bright blue sky, bare feet stompin’ in the cool grass of a mountain meadow. A sea of sun-browned revelers sway as a human tide among blankets colorfully unfurled. Music festival season is in full swing and on stage: The Leftovers, ‘sick’ locally grown Santa Cruz Mountains reggae.

It’s a groove that gets right into your bones. The bass thick and heavy, with steady snare, powerful skank, and the distinctly playful ‘rap rap rap rap’ of the timbale. Everyone’s moving, bobbing to the rhythm and somehow you know every little thing is gonna be alright.

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Guitar player/vocalist, Sean Conner, told me, “We did the Hop N Barley Festival this year – I love day gigs – it’s a totally different vibe. We play the bars, attract the nighttime partiers. But in the day you get to jam out a little more, interact with the crowd – it’s a different feeling.”

Based in the Santa Cruz Mountains, Sean said, “Some of us went to school together at SLVHS. Back then Sean played in a metal band with drummer, Travis Salangsang.  Now as The Leftovers they have gigs just about every weekend, sometimes twice a week. “The music, it’s so much fun – that’s what started it for us – we didn’t even think of a band.” Then someone said, “Why aren’t you guys playing out?” So they decided to give it a shot. “We all just love playing music so much.”

“We’ve been around for about four years now,” Sean said. He and Joey Storm (guitar/vocals) are the originating members, and they recently added Travis and Andrew Zook (bass), David Churchill (keyboards/vocals), Greg Del Bene (Percussion), and Vince D’Andrea (saxophone/vocal). “Sometimes we have girls singing with us (Taylor Rae and Sydney Gorham), but this is the core.”

Sean said they started off definitely reggae-rock. “Now we’re a lot harder to describe. If I had to pick a genre, I’d say reggae, but at the shows we’re all over the place. One minute we’re playing roots reggae, next we’re doing hip hop reggae.” They’ve started calling it “mountain reggae.” It’s simply “The Leftovers sound.”

“We do about half and half, originals and covers that we rotate through. We totally collaborate on new material.” Sometimes they draw inspiration from shows they go to. He cites Raging Fire as an influence when he saw them at the Catalyst, and after seeing Boostive at Bocce’s Cellar, Sean said “We got back from that show and were just feeling it. We were supposed to be practicing and we wound up just jamming out.” They came up with a trippy instrumental with an eerie groove that they named “Frankenstein.” In the key of F, of course.

The Leftovers have played just about every music venue in Santa Cruz County including Zelda’s (one of Sean’s favorites), Moe’s Alley (always a great spot), the Crow’s Nest, Felton Trout Farm, Henfling’s, Don Quixote’s, and outdoors at Junction Park and the Santa Cruz Mountains Art, Music and Wine Festival, among others. And Joey and Sean do an acoustic guitar set every other Tuesday night at Pono Bar and Grill in Santa Cruz. “It’s sort of a residency there.”

“We’ve done well in Santa Cruz…the music is so popular…people seem to want us back.”

The shows are really well attended. “Zelda’s manager was blown away. First he was shocked, ‘Wow, you guys brought so many people!’” Sean admits, “It was so packed it was crazy…you couldn’t even walk around. You had to dance – dance where you were standing!” So the manager invited them to play regularly once a month. It’s been so packed that now the manager wants them twice a month. “Bar sales were through the roof…he was pumped, we were pumped!” People seem to be seeking the necessary nourishment of positivity…and a guaranteed great time out on the town.

With a stage show that includes their own disco ball and laser light experience, Sean says “It’s been getting better and better, there’s such good energy.”

With day jobs and a blazing performance schedule, they’re also somehow finding time to commit their sound to on-demand media. “We’re really pushing on recording.” They did a self-produced 5-song EP but they really want to get a full length professional album made. They’re working on new material with Henry Chadwick at Indigital studios in Santa Cruz. “We grew up with him so we’re already super connected – it’s really easy to work with him, he’s a super awesome guy and a talented musician in his own band. He has a lot of good ideas – it’s good to have an outside voice who’s been there and done it.”

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The Leftovers radiate vibrance and positivity like a breath of fresh air. “We just love the music. If you give someone positive energy, they will give it back – it’s in our nature. That’s our goal with our music is to share the love, that’s what it’s all about.”

Get a taste of The Leftovers at the Santa Cruz Mountains Harvest Festival in Boulder Creek on September 24, and at venues throughout Santa Cruz.

The Leftovers Cali roots reggae: #feelgoodmusic

On Facebook: www.facebook.com/Theleftoversca

Julie Horner is an Irish folk musician and writer living in the Santa Cruz Mountains, California. Email: leap2three@gmail.com | www.leap2three.com

This article was originally published in the Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin: http://mountainbulletin.com/?issue=august-september-2016