Fantastic Figures Await at the New Felton Library

Art Installation Heralds the Coming of the Library

By Felton Library Friends

The Felton Library Festival, which will be held on Saturday, May 20 from 12:00 to 4:00 pm, will feature an art installation of “Fantastic Figures” on the new library site just down Gushee street next to the Post Office. The free event includes art activities for all, food, information on the library project, a drawing for prizes, and live music by Patti Maxine and Friends, Ben Lonesome and the Highway Niners, Dave McClellan and Friends, and Young People’s Theater singers.

The small town of Felton, gateway to the San Lorenzo Valley, has been waiting for a new library for many years. The current library has long outgrown its tiny location in the historic Belardi building. Groundbreaking for the new larger library begins in 2018.

“It has been a long wait,” says Marilyn Robertson, longtime member of Felton Library Friends. “Now we are very excited and feeling rather celebratory.”

The garden art figures, conceived by a group of local artists, Robertson, and Felton Library Friend, Nancy Gerdt, will consist of a dozen larger-than-life sculptures “planted” in the field, each symbolizing the broad spectrum of patrons waiting to use the new library and the tremendous breadth of opportunities a library brings to the public.

Each figure, graciously donated by the artist, will be completely different, and materials will vary according to the artist’s vision. The idea of the waiting figures was the inspiration of Ben Lomond artist, Eileen Murray, who has constructed two such figures in her garden.

“I adapted the idea from the African nkisi, fascinating protective figures covered with hardware and nails, placed in front of properties in the Congo,” Murray explained. “They are very primitive and beautiful. The African figures were originally meant to scare people away, but ours are meant to entice. They are garden art.”  The African Queen, by Eileen Murray, pictured here, will be one of the figures up for auction starting on May 20, with proceeds benefitting the new library and Felton Library Friends.

Additional artists include Karen Asherah, Eleanor Carolan, Alexis Spakoski, Karen Close, Jennifer Hennig, Janet Silverglate, Sophie Webb, Bill Jurgens, Nina Moore, and Lise Bixler. For more information, visit: www.feltonlibraryfriends.org

felton_library_sculpture_photo2.jpg

Copyright 2017 Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin. Originally published in the Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin April 2017 edition. www.santacruzmountainbulletin.net

Advertisements

VANYA and SONIA and MASHA and SPIKE

Ben Lomond’s Mountain Community Theater delivers with world-class production now through May 28, 2017.

The Bottenberg & Horner Report

Mountain Community Theater presents the 2013 Tony Award winner for Best Play, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike by Christopher Durang, directed by Peter Gelblum. The production opened at Ben Lomond’s historic Park Hall on Friday, May 5, and continues on weekends through Sunday, May 28. The cast includes: W. Scott Whisler, Daria E. Troxell, Robin Aronson, Correll Barca-Hall, Ashley Sue Perry, and Sasha Voigt.

Bottenberg – “The cast was brilliant, brought the right level of believability to big emotional roles with a wonderful understanding of the comedy of the book. The ensemble played so well with and against each other. Strongly and professionally directed. Pace and timing was great, balance of the humor and the sadness so well done. A wonderful play – balancing long standing family issues and unhappiness with a satisfying resolution. So much fun to be immersed in a good play with good players. Mountain Community Theater is a gem.”

Horner – “A realistic portrayal of the everyday that lifts the characters out of daily drudgery to tap into the submerged reservoir of dead-end re-visited, re-considered, and ultimately rejected. Family, conceit, insecurity, introspect…and hope, misplaced then re-kindled and re-purposed. Through the characters, we gain courage for living to individual potential without fearing judgement. Perception is not necessarily fact and we learn, with sparkling wit and biting humor, that we are all yearning for our own version of the glittering bauble and that you-must-have-the-wrong-number phone call for a first date on Saturday night. Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike is pure voodoo…it’s just a pinprick but it makes its point. As always, an enthusiastically packed house at Park Hall, chuckles and laughter to the rafters. And how old is Spike, exactly?”

Tickets and info: http://spike.brownpapertickets.com/ | https://mctshows.org/

mountain_community_theater

Horse Balm and Hard Work

Boulder Creek Neighbors social network founded by an old-school cowboy with community at heart.

By Julie Horner

Kevin Foster and his rodeo buddy, Billy Ray Coffey, stood tall and lean in front of Jenna Sue’s, chiseled, well-tanned faces shaded by crisp cowboy hats. Both men seemed naturally compelled to greet passersby – with a gentleman’s nod, touch to the brim, and a genuine “howdy ma’am” – eliciting bemused smiles and reciprocated pleasantry. The man with the bucket of fresh-cut flowers was making his morning rounds. In an entirely spontaneous gesture, Kevin bought a cellophaned bouquet of red roses and asked the man to open the bundle and present a single rose to every lady in Oh Suzannah! Hair Designers…and if there were any left, to take them to the lady patrons next door.

“Two years ago, I wouldn’t remember the exact date, I started Boulder Creek Neighbors because I was in some other groups and people were mean and complained to each other. Where I’m from, you’re kind and polite, you don’t swear. My mom would whip my behind if I’d said some foul language or was rude.” He wanted to bring that ethic to his adopted hometown and figured there was another way to bring people together. “People all need to come together out of their little nooks in these mountains regardless their preferences – you’ve got the elderly…the bar people…the church people.” So, Kevin started the Boulder Creek Neighbors group on Facebook to provide a place for “local, nice, positive neighborly Boulder Creek residents and SLV neighbors to socialize and help one another like neighbors should always do, and to stay connected and know what’s going on in our community.”

The first step was to make some guidelines. He wanted it to be friendly, “make sure folks didn’t have rude pictures up, “fippin’ off the camera. Some groups are about drama; we want to use this group to inspire neighbors to put out positive ideas. People are using social media to complain about the world. I want people who see the world as a blessing…it’s raining, whatever, you can turn a bad day into a good one with positive thinking…it’ll grow on you.”

Kevin started the page, and a team of community members act as administrators to help manage posts. “I still check it daily…I got to monitor the moderators. I brought them together…they ask questions about how to handle difficult posts. “I’m willing to be the bad guy in the group to keep it sweet. I’m not doing it for me, I’m doing it for 2800 members.”

Boulder Creek Neighbors was one of a handful of social network pages that became a crucial lifeline during recent storms. Members were the first to know when trees and mudslides had closed mountain roads and what the immediate, and often everchanging, workarounds were to get from one place to another.

“Not a lot of people do a good deed anymore without expecting something out of it. BC Neighbors, you do it, and down the road, by putting out the good, down the road someone’s always out there to help you. Small town communities like this, when it comes time, the community shows up…whether it’s plumbing…if there’s branches down and someone needs advice or someone to come help…a little old lady all by herself…whatever the cause. I’ll be paid in pies and cakes all day long…it’s taking care of your neighbors.”

“The helpful stuff, he says, “has really blown up on the page.” He points to all the pets that have been saved. “If I had five dollars for every animal that got found and returned. ‘What neighborhood? Yeah, I just saw your dog running down the street.’”

With Boulder Creek Neighbors, Kevin aims to inspire in the cowboy way. “My bull fightin’ students…I teach bull fightin’ and so forth…I’ve got six thousand followers who look to me as inspirational. In the arena, there’s no time to quit. You ain’t out until you’re knocked out. You’re in there fighting bulls and you stay in there, digging in. There’s always two bull fighters, there’s always one who picks the other up…they have your back.”

“You can strip us all down naked and it’s the actions that identify you. And you can really tell the mindset of someone’s heart by what they post on Facebook. There are a lot of good-hearted folks in our mountains…”

Join Boulder Creek Neighbors: www.facebook.com/groups/bouldercreekneighbors/

Copyright 2017 Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin. This article originally published in the April 2017 Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin print edition. Also online: www.santacruzmountainbulletin.net

Bear Creek Country Club – All Eyes on the Prize

BCRPD opens newly acquired Bear Creek Country Club for KBCZ 90.1 Radio fundraiser

By Julie Horner

The first opportunity for the public to enjoy the reopening of Bear Creek Country Club, a recent acquisition by the Boulder Creek Recreation and Parks District, is on Saturday, April 22 for the KBCZ Time Machine Dance Party: 1960s Edition radio station fundraiser, hosted by KBCZ 90.1 FM Boulder Creek Community Radio. The evening includes an all-1960s soundtrack featuring live DJs, a silent auction, beer, and wine. BCRPD’s new Bear Creek Facility, perfectly preserved in full 1960s splendor, is indeed, a time capsule itself.

The 1.2-million-dollar purchase, completed in November of 2016, came with a swimming pool, tennis courts, clubhouse, workout room, hot tub, sauna, four acres of park land, BBQ pits, creek access, basketball court, and interior social areas with soaring ceilings and sophisticated retro decor. To restore, renovate, and upgrade existing structures to meet public building access requirements – and help pay back the loan to the Santa Cruz Land Trust, which was instrumental in completing the sale – the District has launched a crowdfunding campaign with a goal to gather $600,000 over the next two years. To donate, visit: www.crowdrise.com/bear-creek-recreation-and-events-center-funding

Step back to the future and join the KBCZ Time Machine 1960s Dance Party: www.facebook.com/events/1351172781617271

 

 

Copyright 2017 Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin. Originally printed in the Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin April 2017 edition. www.santacruzmountainbulletin.netwww.facebook.com/SantaCruzMountainBulletin/

Camp Krem – Camping Unlimited – Anticipates the Arrival of Summer Revelers with Fifth Annual Do-It-Ourselves Festival April 28-30, 2017

By Julie Horner

As antidote to the dark and wet, rustic Jon Lucchese Center stands on a sandy plateau in full sun biding over a sweeping panorama of forest and blue sky. The air, soft and moistly fragrant with oak and bay, is gratefully languid after an eternity of torrential rain, mud, and cabin fever. It is peacefully still, the only sounds being the rush of nearby Peavine Creek and the roaring press of silence. Founded in 1957 by special needs educator, Alex Krem, Sr., Boulder Creek’s family run campground created especially for “giving exceptional people the opportunity to be themselves,” welcomes the coming of spring and “new worlds of discovery, adventure, and friendship.” Summer, says camp manager Christina Krem, “is rowdy” with campers of all ages eager to embark on outdoor educational experiences that will help them build lifelong relationships with nature.

17757329_10212678525855662_243356143332599301_n

In addition to sprucing things up for the anticipated 500 or so adults and young people with disabilities who will revel on this mountaintop over the course of the spring and summer, the staff at Camp Krem is also about to do it up for Do-It-Ourselves, the fifth annual DIO Festival, a reliably sold-out weekend music experience which brings world-class up-and-coming talent to Boulder Creek for three days in late April. DIO Fest is one of the groups outside of regular summer camp programs who responsibly rent the facility; the intention is to present an intimate festival vibe while giving back to the community.

DIOHAMMERdraft copy

The connection between Camp Krem and the DIO Fest goes back to when DIO Fest co-founder, Jon Labeaud and his wife, Andrea, worked as camp counselors. And in part because of that relationship, Christina says, the team that puts on DIO Fest has given back to the Camping Unlimited community by donating a portion of festival proceeds to the camp’s musicology program, with monies going directly to the salary of the on-staff music therapist. And the team of volunteers who set up and tear down lend their energy every year to improving existing infrastructure; Christina noted specifically the addition of a permanent roof on the amphitheater and new and reinforced structural stage elements inside Jon Lucchese Center. These are performance areas that campers use during the rest of the season for the talent show, a highlight of the camping experience, which helps develop a sense of individual self-worth, while being built-in fun.

Part of the ethic of giving back includes the opportunity for musicians, dancers, and artists of all kinds to volunteer their time at Camp Krem to help inspire and delight. Several musicians who have performed at DIO Fest have returned at later dates to share their music, Christina said, including Kendra McKinley, Big Bear, McCoy Tyler Band, and Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra. Local talent is very much invited to come share what they do best. Whether by volunteering time or by making a monetary gift, “donations are hugely appreciated.”

Come explore Camp Krem, meet the staff, and tour the facilities at their open house, Saturday, May 13, 2017 from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm | 102 Brook Lane, Boulder Creek | 831- 338 – 3210 | www.campingunlimited.org

Get tickets for the Do-It-Ourselves Festival: www.facebook.com/DoItOurselves/

Copyright 2017 Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin. Originally published in the March 2017 issue of the Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin: www.santacruzmountainbulletin.net

krem1

Camp Krem – Camping Unlimited – Anticipates the Arrival of Summer Revelers with Fifth Annual Do-It-Ourselves Festival April 28-30, 2017

krem1

By Julie Horner

As antidote to the dark and wet, rustic Jon Lucchese Center stands on a sandy plateau in full sun biding over a sweeping panorama of forest and blue sky. The air, soft and moistly fragrant with oak and bay, is gratefully languid after an eternity of torrential rain, mud, and cabin fever. It is peacefully still, the only sounds being the rush of nearby Peavine Creek and the roaring press of silence. Founded in 1957 by special needs educator, Alex Krem, Sr., Boulder Creek’s family run campground created especially for “giving exceptional people the opportunity to be themselves,” welcomes the coming of spring and “new worlds of discovery, adventure, and friendship.” Summer, says camp manager Christina Krem, “is rowdy” with campers of all ages eager to embark on outdoor educational experiences that will help them build lifelong relationships with nature.

In addition to sprucing things up for the anticipated 500 or so adults and young people with disabilities who will revel on this mountaintop over the course of the spring and summer, the staff at Camp Krem is also about to do it up for Do-It-Ourselves, the fifth annual DIO Festival, a reliably sold-out weekend music experience which brings world-class up-and-coming talent to Boulder Creek for three days in late April. DIO Fest is one of the groups outside of regular summer camp programs who responsibly rent the facility; the intention is to present an intimate festival vibe while giving back to the community.

The connection between Camp Krem and the DIO Fest goes back to when DIO Fest co-founder, Jon Labeaud and his wife, Andrea, worked as camp counselors. And in part because of that relationship, Christina says, the team that puts on DIO Fest has given back to the Camping Unlimited community by donating a portion of festival proceeds to the camp’s musicology program, with monies going directly to the salary of the on-staff music therapist. And the team of volunteers who set up and tear down lend their energy every year to improving existing infrastructure; Christina noted specifically the addition of a permanent roof on the amphitheater and new and reinforced structural stage elements inside Jon Lucchese Center. These are performance areas that campers use during the rest of the season for the talent show, a highlight of the camping experience, which helps develop a sense of individual self-worth, while being built-in fun.

Part of the ethic of giving back includes the opportunity for musicians, dancers, and artists of all kinds to volunteer their time at Camp Krem to help inspire and delight. Several musicians who have performed at DIO Fest have returned at later dates to share their music, Christina said, including Kendra McKinley, Big Bear, McCoy Tyler Band, and Marty O’Reilly & the Old Soul Orchestra. Local talent is very much invited to come share what they do best. Whether by volunteering time or by making a monetary gift, “donations are hugely appreciated.”

Come explore Camp Krem, meet the staff, and tour the facilities at their open house, Saturday, May 13, 2017 from 10:00 am to 4:00 pm | 102 Brook Lane, Boulder Creek | 831- 338 – 3210 | http://www.campingunlimited.org

Fully Fledged – KBCZ 90.1 Boulder Creek Community Radio

The only thing missing is the moose…
By Julie Horner
From the window overlooking the bustling intersection of this one-stop small mountain town, a constant stream of people and cars kaleidoscope past in a blur of sound and color. Afternoon sun brightens newly painted walls, the space clean, comfortably spare, and cozy yet with plenty of wiggle room to work the imagination. Sheltered within the KBCZ’s freshly functional broadcast digs, music mingles with the muted sounds of life at full speed.
For a moment it feels like “Chris in the Morning,” the fictional DJ from the make-believe Alaska radio station KBHR (“K-Bear”) from Northern Exposure, the TV series that aired in the early 90s. At some point that ubiquitous moose will wobble past the window.
KBCZ is a non-profit, non-partisan, non-commercial educational (NCE) live broadcast and cloud streaming radio station committed to serving the local community. Programming pulls from local expertise, boasting a team of 25 DJs producing original content that includes music, local history, art, agriculture, lifestyle, weather, emergency information, safety issues, community events, and the local economy. KBCZ is operated by the Boulder Creek Recreation and Park District, which holds the FCC license and pays music industry fees. The station is sustained financially through donations, fundraising, and local business underwriting.
Program Manager, Tina Davey, has been with the project since the beginning, about three years. Well known on the Central Coast as a professional voiceover artist, when the opportunity arose to help start a community radio station, she jumped on it. She went to the initial meetings when Tim Welch was spearheading the early effort and together with a growing team of local talent, has been instrumental in bringing the station “out of the closet” and fully fledged to the well-intentioned but underused Boulder Creek Visitor Center located in the Burl Business Center at 13200 Highway 9, Suite A, adjacent to Boulder Creek Pizza & Pub.
Initially the station shared space with the Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin above Jenna Sue’s. They eventually moved to a converted closet in the BC Rec building, all the while growing the station’s music archives, building the on-air team, and gaining support throughout the community with periodic fundraisers like Flicks in the Sticks (an outdoor family movie night held at Junction Park), themed dances, and outdoor festivals.
The station went online late in 2016 with their first regular live broadcast – the KBCZ Morning Show – at Barry Tanner’s Boulder Creek Music Works in the former post office building. Then the Visitor Center became available and in January, 2017, station devotees, Leslie and Matt Buchanan began remodeling the interior from the ground up, completely transforming the space into a fully functional DJ booth and reception area. Tina Davey said of their first officially dedicated public broadcasting space, “We were in the closet for over a year. We’re just thrilled to be here…like we’re in the Taj Mahal!”
Tina says KBCZ is actively looking for community members who would like to program their own shows. Prior DJ experience is always welcome but is not a prerequisite, and training on the computer-based broadcast program is provided. “We are also looking for grant writers and members to be on an advisory board; we already have two people from KSCO who are helping.”
The goal, Tina says, is to fill all the empty DJ slots with NCE content…cars, cooking, kids sports (they’re planning to approach student talent at SLVHS), and other ideas from community members. “The radio station is going to explode this year. We need people who want to be engineers, work the software, talk, and interview. We need more people – just everybody!”
As KBCZ gears up for their April 22 fundraiser – a 60s inspired time machine dance and silent auction at BC Rec’s newly acquired Bear Creek Country Club – Tina and her team are soaking in the excitement of the new broadcast space at the Visitor Center. “We’ve wanted this space for a long time…we finally got it. Now we’re going to be visible.”
Listener supported radio for the San Lorenzo Valley, local original programming at 90.1 FM and streaming online. http://kbcz.org/ | www.facebook.com/BCRadioNow
Copyright 2017 Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin. Originally published in the Santa Cruz Mountain Bulletin, March 2017. www.santacruzmountainbulletin.net | www.facebook.com/SantaCruzMountainBulletin/
tina1